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Hormones (Athens). 2012 Jul-Sep;11(3):316-24.

The effect of a non-intensive community-based lifestyle intervention on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The DEPLAN study in Greece.

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1
First Department of Propaedeutic Medicine, Athens University Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece. kmakrila@med.uoa.gr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a non-intensive, community-based, lifestyle intervention program on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), in individuals at high risk for development of type 2 diabetes (T2D).

DESIGN:

In accordance with the FINDRISC score, 191 high-risk persons for T2D, 56.3±10.8 years old, participated in a one-year lifestyle intervention program consisting of six bi-monthly sessions with a dietician. MS prevalence was assessed at baseline and one year later.

RESULTS:

The intervention was completed by 125 participants. They lost on average 1.0±4.8 kg (p=0.025) (mean±SD) and registered favourable dietary changes. The baseline prevalence of MS was similar among age groups and genders and decreased after one year (from 63.4±48.4% to 54.8±50.0%, p<0.001). In a multiple logistic regression model, younger age (p=0.009), male gender (p=0.004), improvement of the dietary score after one year (p=0.022), a lower FINDRISC score (p=0.033), a lower triglyceride level (p=0.010) and a higher baseline HDL-C level (p=0.003) were significantly and independently associated with improvement in MS status.

CONCLUSIONS:

A non-intensive lifestyle intervention program to prevent T2D is effective in decreasing the prevalence of MS in individuals at high risk for T2D development, possibly conferring multiple cardiovascular health benefits.

PMID:
22908064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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