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Prev Med. 2012 Oct;55(4):285-291. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.08.001. Epub 2012 Aug 12.

The effect of personal lifestyle intervention among health care providers on their patients and clinics; the Promoting Health by Self Experience (PHASE) randomized controlled intervention trial.

Author information

1
The S. Daniel Abraham Center for Health and Nutrition and Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: irish@bgu.ac.il.
2
Clalit Health Services, Dan Petah Tikva District, Israel.
3
Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services and Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
4
Promoting Medical Information and Research Clalit Health Services, Dan Petah Tikva District and Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.
5
Nutrition & Health, Unilever, Israel.
6
The S. Daniel Abraham Center for Health and Nutrition and Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effect of self-experience multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention on health care providers (HCPs), patients and clinics.

METHODS:

We randomized 15 primary-care clinics (serving 93,821 members), matched by patient profile, to provide the HCPs, either intervention or control HMO program. We followed personally 77 HCPs and 496 patients, and evaluated clinical measurement rate (CMR) changes (January-September 2010; Israel).

RESULTS:

HCPs within the intervention group demonstrated personal improvement in health initiative attitudes (p<0.05 vs. baseline), and a decrease in salt intake (p<0.05 vs. control). HCP intervention group's patients exhibited overall improvement in dietary patterns, specifically in salt, red meat (p<0.05 vs. baseline), fruit, and vegetable (p<0.05 vs. control) intake. Height, lipids, HbA1(C) and CMR increased within the intervention group's clinics (p<0.05 vs. baseline) with increased referral to angiography tests (p<0.05 vs. control). Within the intervention group, HCPs' salt pattern improvement was associated with increased lipid CMR (r=0.71; p=0.048), and lower HCPs' body weight was associated with increased blood pressure (r=-0.81; p=0.015) and lipid (r=-0.69; p=0.058) CMR.

CONCLUSIONS:

HCPs' personal lifestyles are directly correlated with their clinical performance. Interventions to promote health through HCP's self-experience are valuable and somewhat haloed to patients and clinics, suggesting an adjunct strategy in primary prevention.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01129895.

PMID:
22906808
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.08.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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