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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Oct;23(10):1017-24. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2012.06.006. Epub 2012 Aug 17.

Sedentary behaviour and clustered metabolic risk in adolescents: the HELENA study.

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1
GENUD Research Group, University of Zaragoza, C/Corona de Aragon, 42, Zaragoza E-50009, Spain. Electronic address: jprey@unizar.es.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Although sedentary behaviours are linked with mortality for cardiovascular reasons, it is not clear whether they are negatively related with cardio-metabolic risk factors. The aim was to examine the association between time engaged in television (TV) viewing or playing with videogames and a clustered cardio-metabolic risk in adolescents.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Sedentary behaviours and physical activity were assessed in 769 adolescents (376 boys, aged 12.5-17.5 years) from the HELENA-CSS study. We measured systolic blood pressure, HOMA index, triglycerides, TC/HDL-c, VO₂max and the sum of four skinfolds, and a clustered metabolic risk index was computed. A multilevel regression model (by Poisson) was performed to calculate the prevalence ratio of having a clustered metabolic risk. In boys, playing >4 h/day with videogames (weekend) and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) was associated with cardio-metabolic risk after adjustment for age, maternal education and MVPA. In contrast, TV viewing was not associated with the presence of cardio-metabolic risk.

CONCLUSION:

In boys, playing with videogames may impair cardio-metabolic health during the adolescence. Adolescents should be encouraged to increase their participation in physical activity of at least moderate intensity to obtain a more favourable risk factor profile.

KEYWORDS:

Clustered metabolic risk; Physical activity; Sedentary behaviour; Videogames

PMID:
22906564
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2012.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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