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Surv Ophthalmol. 2012 Sep;57(5):415-29. doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2012.01.007.

Corneal neovascularization: an anti-VEGF therapy review.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago 60612, USA. changr@uic.edu

Abstract

Corneal neovascularization is a serious condition that can lead to a profound decline in vision. The abnormal vessels block light, cause corneal scarring, compromise visual acuity, and may lead to inflammation and edema. Corneal neovascularization occurs when the balance between angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors is tipped toward angiogenic molecules. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the most important mediators of angiogenesis, is upregulated during neovascularization. In fact, anti-VEGF agents have efficacy in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, macular edema, neovascular glaucoma, and other neovascular diseases. These same agents have great potential for the treatment of corneal neovascularization. We review some of the most promising anti-VEGF therapies, including bevacizumab, VEGF trap, siRNA, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

PMID:
22898649
PMCID:
PMC3709023
DOI:
10.1016/j.survophthal.2012.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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