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Med Care. 2012 Sep;50(9 Suppl 2):S74-9. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182641110.

Associations between aspects of culturally competent care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. afernandez@medsfgh.ucsf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Culturally competent care may be associated with clinical outcomes in diabetes management, which requires effective physician-patient collaboration. The recent development and validation of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competence tool enables investigation of possible associations.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether 3 aspects of culturally competent care are associated with glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure control among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes.

DESIGN:

Survey and chart review study of patients recruited from urban safety net clinics in 2 cities.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 600 patients with type 2 diabetes and a primary care physician.

MEASURES:

We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the independent relationships between the 3 domains of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competence (Doctor Communication-Positive Behaviors, Trust, and Doctor Communication-Health Promotion) and glycemic, lipid, and systolic blood pressure control after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors.

RESULTS:

In adjusted analysis, high Trust was associated with lower likelihood of poor glycemic control (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.84) and high Doctor Communication-Health Promotion was associated with a higher likelihood of poor glycemic control (odds ratio, 1.49, 95% CI, 1.02-2.19). None of the 3 aspects of culturally competent care examined were associated with lipid or systolic blood pressure control after adjustment.

DISCUSSION:

Trust in physician, a core component of culturally competent care, but not doctor communication behavior, was associated with a lower likelihood of poor glycemic control in a safety net population with diabetes. Glycemic control may be more sensitive to patient physician partnership than blood pressure and hyperlipidemia control.

PMID:
22895235
DOI:
10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182641110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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