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Med Care. 2012 Sep;50(9 Suppl 2):S56-61. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182640adf.

Risk factors for reporting poor cultural competency among patients with diabetes in safety net clinics.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-1364, USA. hseligman@medsfgh.ucsf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency Item Set assesses patient perceptions of aspects of the cultural competence of their health care.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine characteristics of patients who identify the care they receive as less culturally competent.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey consisting of face-to-face interviews.

SUBJECTS:

Safety-net population of patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600) receiving ongoing primary care.

MEASURES:

Participants completed the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency and answered questions about their race/ethnicity, sex, age, education, health status, depressive symptoms, insurance coverage, English proficiency, duration of relationship with primary care provider, and comorbidities.

RESULTS:

In adjusted models, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poor cultural competency in the Doctor Communication--Positive Behaviors domain [odds ratio (OR) 1.73, 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.69]. African Americans were less likely than whites to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication--Positive Behaviors domain (OR 0.52, 95% CI, 0.28-0.97). Participants who reported a longer relationship (≥ 3 y) with their primary care provider were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication--Health Promotion (OR 0.35, 95% CI, 0.21-0.60) and Trust domains (OR 0.4, 95% CI, 0.24-0.67), whereas participants with lower educational attainment were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Trust domain (OR 0.51, 95% CI, 0.30-0.86). Overall, however, sociodemographic and clinical differences in reports of poor cultural competence were insignificant or inconsistent across the various domains of cultural competence examined.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cultural competence interventions in safety-net settings should be implemented across populations, rather than being narrowly focused on specific sociodemographic or clinical groups.

PMID:
22895232
PMCID:
PMC3466108
DOI:
10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182640adf
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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