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Eur J Endocrinol. 2012 Nov;167(5):619-24. doi: 10.1530/EJE-12-0632. Epub 2012 Aug 15.

The association of cardiac ventricular hypertrophy with congenital hyperinsulinism.

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1
Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK. indi.banerjee@cmft.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Ventricular hypertrophy (VH) has been observed in children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), a condition of hypoglycaemia characterised by dysregulated insulin secretion, but the prevalence is not known.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Cardiac assessment was performed in children (n=49) with CHI at diagnosis and follow-up. Two dimensional and Doppler echocardiography studies were used to assess cardiac structures, while M-mode study was used to measure left ventricular (LV) dimensions, subsequently converted to Z scores. Where possible, LV hypertrophy was confirmed by LV mass index (g/m(2.7)) >95th centile.

RESULTS:

Cardiac structural lesions were found in 14 (28%) children. At initial echocardiography, VH was present in 31 (65%) children with median (range) LV posterior wall dimension in diastole Z scores of +1.6 (-2.4 to +5.8) and interventricular septal wall dimension in end diastole Z scores of +1.9 (-1.7 to +17.2). At follow-up echocardiography, performed after an interval of 178 (45-390) days, VH persisted in 16 (33%) children. In regression analysis, the presence of VH (odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) 1.1 (1.0-1.2), P=0.04) at initial echocardiography was correlated with maximum glucose requirement at diagnosis, indicating that severity of CHI at presentation may play a role in the pathogenesis of VH.

CONCLUSIONS:

A significant proportion of children with CHI have cardiac structural lesions. A majority also have VH, which may be associated with the severity of CHI at diagnosis. VH may persist in some children, which requires careful long-term cardiac review.

PMID:
22894813
DOI:
10.1530/EJE-12-0632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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