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Dysphagia. 2013 Jun;28(2):123-30. doi: 10.1007/s00455-012-9420-2. Epub 2012 Aug 15.

A bibliometric review of published abstracts presented at the Dysphagia Research Society: 2001-2011.

Author information

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA. plowman@usf.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to perform a comprehensive bibliometric review of published abstracts presented at the Dysphagia Research Society between 2001 and 2011 in order to delineate research trends, identify knowledge gaps, and recommend areas for future dysphagia research. All 972 research abstracts, both oral and poster presentations, were included. Study designs included cross-sectional (n = 333, 34.4 %), cohort (n = 279, 28.8 %), and case series (n = 210, 21.7 %), while randomized controlled trials constituted only 3.3 % (n = 32) of all research presentations. Levels of evidence were assigned based on analysis of abstract details, as level 1 (n = 29, 3.0 %), level 2 (n = 639, 65.7 %), level 3 (n = 53, 5.5 %), level 4 (n = 243, 25.0 %), and level 5 (n = 8, 0.8 %). Research topics included normal swallowing pathophysiology (n = 279, 28.7 %), swallowing physiology (n = 266, 27.4 %), swallowing diagnosis (n = 192, 19.7 %), swallowing treatment (n = 165, 17.0 %), clinical policy and practice (n = 36, 3.7 %), and basic science (n = 34, 3.5 %). Research occurred in adults (n = 861, 88.6 %), pediatrics (n = 76, 7.8 %), animals (n = 29, 3.0 %), cadavers (n = 3, 0.3 %), and mechanical models (n = 3, 0.3 %). Presenting authors represented 14 different disciplines, with the majority in speech-language pathology, dentistry, basic science, and otolaryngology. Research was performed in 14 different countries with increased geographical diversity during the decade of analysis. Research recommendations derived from our findings call for increased (1) randomized controlled clinical trials consistent with level 1 evidence, (2) focus on pediatric feeding and swallowing, (3) use of animal models to study swallowing dysfunction and novel treatments, and (4) investigations from additional medical specialties. In addition, we applaud current trends and encourage continued support of interdisciplinary, international, and trainee representation.

PMID:
22893228
DOI:
10.1007/s00455-012-9420-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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