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Annu Rev Nurs Res. 2011;29:281-302.

Type 2 diabetes, genomics, and nursing: necessary next steps to advance the science into improved, personalized care.

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1
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an inherited, chronic disorder with long-term complications; including cardiovascular disease the leading cause of mortality in the United States. The prevalence of T2DM and its complications are on the rise in the United States, highlighting the need for improved individualized prevention and treatment strategies. Exciting advancements in the field of genomics has led to the recent discovery of numerous genetic markers for T2DM; completing a promising first step toward improved, individualized prevention and treatment strategies for T2DM. These genomic markers, identified using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), candidate gene, and rare variant methodology, identify new physiologic pathways underlying the development of T2DM. Much more work is needed to successfully translate the identification of genetic markers for T2DM into improved, individualized prevention and treatment strategies. As front line providers and leaders of prevention and treatment strategies for chronic disease, nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists must contribute to this translational effort. Thus, it is important for nurses at all levels to (a) be aware of the current science of genetics and T2DM and (b) participate in the translation of this genetic information into improved, personalized patient care. The aim of this review is to (a) provide an overview of the current state of the science of genetic markers and T2DM and (b) highlight essential next steps to successfully translate the identification of genetic markers for T2DM into improved prevention and treatment strategies; focusing particularly on the role of nursing in this process.

PMID:
22891509
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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