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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2012 Sep 19;367(1602):2619-39. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2012.0003.

Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Abstract

Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase repertoire, or kinome, is in general significantly larger than other eukaryotes, ranging in size from 600 to 2500 members. This large variation in kinome size is mainly due to the expansion and contraction of a few families, particularly the receptor-like kinase/Pelle family. A number of protein kinases reside in highly conserved, low copy number families and often play broadly conserved regulatory roles in metabolism and cell division, although functions of plant homologues have often diverged from their metazoan counterparts. Members of expanded plant kinase families often have roles in plant-specific processes and some may have contributed to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, non-adaptive explanations, such as kinase duplicate subfunctionalization and insufficient time for pseudogenization, may also contribute to the large number of seemingly functional protein kinases in plants.

PMID:
22889912
PMCID:
PMC3415837
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2012.0003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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