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J Athl Train. 2012 Jul-Aug;47(4):372-8. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-47.4.16.

Biomechanical analysis of the anterior lunge during 4 external-load conditions.

Author information

1
Biodynamics Center, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah, GA 31419, USA. Bryan.Riemann@armstrong.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Comprehensive analysis of ankle, knee, and hip kinematics and kinetics during anterior lunge performance in young adults has not been studied. In addition, the effects of adding external resistance on the kinematics and kinetics are unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of external load on ankle, knee, and hip joint kinematics and kinetics during the anterior lunge.

DESIGN:

Crossover study.

SETTING:

Laboratory environment.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 16 recreationally active, college-aged adults (8 men, 8 women).

INTERVENTION(S):

Anterior lunges under 4 external-load conditions, 0% (control), 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of body mass.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Ankle, knee, and hip peak flexion, net joint extensor moment impulse, and eccentric and concentric work were computed during the interval when the stepping limb was in contact with the ground. Additionally, 3 summary lunge characteristics were calculated.

RESULTS:

No significant (P > .05) load effects were noted for peak flexion angles or the lunge characteristics except for peak vertical total-body center-of-mass displacement. Trend analysis of significant condition-by-joint interactions revealed significant linear trends for all 3 joints, with the hip greater than the ankle and the ankle greater than the knee. Additionally, as the external load increased, mechanical work increased linearly at the hip and ankle but not at the knee.

CONCLUSIONS:

From a kinematic perspective, the lunge involves greater motion at the knee, but from a kinetic perspective, the anterior lunge is a hip-extensor-dominant exercise. Adding external weight prompted the greatest joint kinetic increases at the hip and ankle, with little change in the knee contributions. These results can assist clinicians in deciding whether the characteristics of the anterior lunge match a patient's exercise needs during rehabilitation and performance-enhancement programs.

PMID:
22889652
PMCID:
PMC3396296
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-47.4.16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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