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Acad Pediatr. 2012 Sep-Oct;12(5):391-8. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2012.06.001. Epub 2012 Aug 11.

The medical home: relationships with family functioning for children with and without special health care needs.

Author information

1
Massachusetts General Hospital, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. aarauz@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study we tested the association of the medical home with family functioning for children without and with special health care needs (CSHCN).

METHODS:

We used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health to run multivariate logistic regressions to test the association between having a medical home and family functioning (difficulty with parental coping, parental aggravation, childcare/work issues, and missed school days). We further assessed interactions of CSHCN status with having a medical home.

RESULTS:

In adjusted analysis, parents of children with a medical home were less likely to report difficulty with parental coping (odds ratio [OR] 0.26 [0.19-0.36]), parental aggravation (OR 0.54 [0.45-0.65]), childcare/work issues (OR 0.72 [0.61-0.84]), and missed school days (OR 0.87[0.78-0.97]) for their children than those without a medical home. Using interaction terms, we found that for most outcomes, the medical home had a greater association for CSHCN compared with healthy peers, with odds ratios ranging 0.40 (CI 0.22-0.56) for parental aggravation to 0.67 (CI0.52-0.86) for missed school days.

CONCLUSIONS:

We show that the medical home is associated with better family functioning. All children may benefit from receiving care in a medical home, but CSHCN, who have greater needs, may particularly benefit from this enhanced model of care.

PMID:
22884797
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2012.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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