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J Pediatr. 2012 Dec;161(6):1022-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.063. Epub 2012 Aug 9.

Serum resistin and inflammatory and endothelial activation markers in obese adolescents.

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1
Pediatric Sport Medicine and Obesity Care Program, Service of Pediatric Specialties, Department of Child and Adolescent, University Hospitals of Geneva and University of Geneva, Switzerland. albane.maggio@hcuge.ch.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the level of serum resistin in obese and lean children and to establish a relationship with circulating inflammatory and vascular markers.

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a cross-sectional study including 67 obese and 62 lean children (mean age 10.9 ± 2.8 years, age range 5.4-16.6 years). We assessed circulating hormones (insulin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor 1), markers of inflammation (resistin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, chemokine ligand 2), and endothelial cell activation (vascular and intercellular adhesion molecules: vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule; E-selectin; P-selectin; endothelin 1).

RESULTS:

Body weight, body mass index (BMI), insulin, leptin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, vascular adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin levels were significantly higher in obese than in lean subjects. Resistin was similar among the groups in the prepubertal period, but increased significantly in the obese adolescents (18.6 ± 24.9) compared with lean subjects (7.9 ± 10.7 ng/mL; P = .038). Resistin was not associated with BMI z score (P > .05). Subjects with resistin levels above 9 (ng/mL) had higher concentration of interleukin-6, chemokine ligand 2, endothelin-1, and insulin-like growth factor 1 but not of leptin, insulin, or BMI.

CONCLUSION:

Resistin was increased in obese adolescents independently of the quantity of the adipose tissue. In this population, increased resistin levels were related to inflammation and endothelial activation. We may hypothesize that interventions aiming to diminish resistin expression may slow down atherogenesis in adolescents.

PMID:
22884361
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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