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J Vet Intern Med. 2012 Sep-Oct;26(5):1093-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1939-1676.2012.00985.x. Epub 2012 Aug 7.

Acute azotemia as a predictor of mortality in dogs and cats.

Author information

1
Internal Medicine, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Emily.harison@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been shown to be a predictor of mortality in human medicine. Published studies in the veterinary literature evaluating relative changes in serum creatinine concentration as a prognostic factor are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate an AKI grading system based on serum creatinine concentration to determine if it correlates with outcome prediction in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS:

Six hundred forty-five dogs and 209 cats that had at least 2 serum creatinine concentration measurements measured within 7 days.

METHODS:

Retrospective study. Dogs and cats with an initial serum creatinine concentrations of ≤ 1.6 mg/dL and that had more than 1 concentration measured within 2, 3, and 7 days were placed into levels (0-2) based on absolute changes. Mortality then was determined at 30 and 90 days.

RESULTS:

Based on odds ratios calculated with a 95% confidence interval, dogs placed in level 1 within 2 days were approximately 3 times more likely to die within 90 days. Dogs placed in level 2 within 2, 3, or 7 days were approximately 3 times more likely to die within 30 or 90 days. Cats placed in level 2 within 3 or 7 days were approximately 3 times more likely to die at 30 days and 4 times more likely to die if placed in this level within 7 days. If placed in level 2 within 2 or 3 days, cats were approximately 3 times more likely to die within 90 days.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Detecting increasing severity of azotemia helps predict mortality in dogs and cats.

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