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Hypertens Res. 2013 Jan;36(1):19-24. doi: 10.1038/hr.2012.123. Epub 2012 Aug 9.

Central blood pressure: a powerful predictor of the development of hypertension.

Author information

1
Second Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. tomiyama@tokyo-med.ac.jp

Abstract

We examined whether the central aortic systolic blood pressure, a marker of the function of the systemic arterial tree, might be a more powerful predictor of the development of hypertension than the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, a marker of the stiffness of the large- to middle-sized arteries, independent of the conventional risk factors for the development of hypertension. In 1268 Japanese men without hypertension (43±8 years old), the relationships between three variables (the second peak of the radial pressure waveform (SP2), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and conventional risk factors measured at the first examination) with the presence of hypertension at the second examination (after 3 years' follow-up) were examined. Hypertension was detected at the second examination in 154 men. The best cutoff points of the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and SP2, for predicting the development of hypertension, were 12.7 m/s and 109 mm Hg, respectively. The results of a logistic regression analysis confirmed that an SP2 of ≥109 mm Hg (odds ratio=8.493, P<0.001) was a more powerful predictor of the development of hypertension than a brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity of ≥12.7 m/s, independent of the conventional risk factors. The net reclassification index of SP2 (at the best cutoff point) to brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was 0.211 (P<0.001), indicating that SP2 is a better predictor of the development of hypertension than brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. In middle-aged Japanese men without hypertension, SP2 may be a more powerful predictor of the development of hypertension than the assessment of stiffness in large to middle-sized arteries independent of the conventional risk factors.

PMID:
22875067
DOI:
10.1038/hr.2012.123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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