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Pharm Biol. 2012 Oct;50(10):1310-6. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2012.674535. Epub 2012 Aug 9.

Passion flower extract antagonizes the expression of nicotine locomotor sensitization in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Buies Creek, NC 27506, USA. breivogel@campbell.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Nicotine, a bioactive component of tobacco, is highly addictive. Numerous therapies have been developed or are currently under investigation for smoking cessation, and all have met with limited success and/or side effects, indicating the need for additional therapies.

OBJECTIVE:

This study examines the ability of a commerically-available aqueous extract of Passiflora incarnata Linn. (Passifloraceae) to ameliorate the signs of nicotine sensitization using a rat model.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Rats were administered 0.4 mg/kg nicotine or vehicle once a day for four consecutive days. Nicotine adminstration produces sensitization of locomotor activity, a phenomenon implicated in the development of nicotine dependence. On the fifth day, locomotor activity of the subjects was monitored as rats from each treatment group were administered 800 mg/kg of Passiflora incarnata extract (or its vehicle) followed by a challenge dose of 0.4 mg/kg nicotine.

RESULTS:

When given to rats sensitized to nicotine for 4 days, the challenge dose of nicotine increased locomotor activity by more than 2-fold over activity following nicotine challenge in rats treated with vehicle during the sensitization phase. The difference was significant from 15-40 min after nicotine administration. Rats sensitized to nicotine then treated with Passiflora incarnata extract prior to the nicotine challenge exhibited a level of locomotor activity the same as the vehicle-treated controls.

DISCUSSION:

Passiflora incarnata extract did antagonize the expression of nicotine locomotor sensitization.

CONCLUSION:

Passiflora incarnata extract should be examined in future studies to evaluate its potential for treating nicotine addiction in humans.

PMID:
22873194
DOI:
10.3109/13880209.2012.674535
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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