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Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2013 Mar;251(3):797-802. doi: 10.1007/s00417-012-2117-2. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

Changing indications for penetrating keratoplasty in Homburg/Saar from 2001 to 2010--histopathology of 1,200 corneal buttons.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar, Germany. jiong_wang@live.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To evaluate the trends in indications for penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in Homburg/Saar between 2001 and 2010.

METHODS:

Retrospective review of 1,200 corneal buttons which underwent PKP that were performed between 2001 and 2010 at the Department of Ophthalmology of Saarland University Hospital, Germany. Indications were classified into eight different groups following histological analysis: keratoconus, Fuchs' dystrophy, bullous keratopathy, corneal scars, keratitis, regraft, corneal dystrophy other than Fuchs' dystrophy, and other diagnoses. Two different time periods (between 2001-2005 and between 2006-2010) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Keratoconus (25.5 %) was the most common indication for PKP in our study, followed by Fuchs' dystrophy (21.2 %), bullous keratopathy (14.6 %), corneal scars (14.4 %), keratitis (13.0 %), regraft (7.0 %), non-Fuchs' dystrophies (2.1 %), and other diagnoses (2.3 %). Comparing the two different time periods, a trend of significantly increasing frequency of keratoconus and Fuchs' dystrophy, and a decreasing frequency of corneal scars, were found as indications for PKP in our study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Keratoconus was the leading indication for PKP in our series, and had a significantly increasing trend from 2001-2005 to 2006-2010. The percentage of patients with Fuchs' dystrophy increased, and became the second most common indication for PKP, while the number of PKPs for corneal scars decreased during the last 5 years in our institution.

PMID:
22850977
DOI:
10.1007/s00417-012-2117-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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