Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Child Lang. 2013 Sep;40(4):821-35. doi: 10.1017/S030500091200030X. Epub 2012 Jul 31.

A long-term predictive validity study: can the CDI Short Form be used to predict language and early literacy skills four years later?

Author information

1
University of Washington, Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, Portage Bay Building, Box 357988, Seattle, Washington 98195, United States. dilara@u.washington.edu

Abstract

This longitudinal study examined the predictive validity of the MacArthur Communicative Developmental Inventories-Short Form (CDI-SF), a parent report questionnaire about children's language development (Fenson, Pethick, Renda, Cox, Dale & Reznick, 2000). Data were first gathered from parents on the CDI-SF vocabulary scores for seventy-six children (mean age=1 ; 10). Four years later (mean age=6 ; 1), children were assessed on language outcomes (expressive vocabulary, syntax, semantics and pragmatics) and code-related skills, including phonemic awareness, word recognition and decoding skills. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that early expressive vocabulary accounted for 17% of the variance in picture vocabulary, 11% of the variance in syntax, and 7% of the variance in semantics, while not accounting for any variance in pragmatics in kindergarten. CDI-SF scores did not predict code-related skills in kindergarten. The importance of early vocabulary skills for later language development and CDI-SF as a valuable research tool are discussed.

PMID:
22849849
DOI:
10.1017/S030500091200030X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center