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Gynecol Endocrinol. 2013 Feb;29(2):152-5. doi: 10.3109/09513590.2012.708802. Epub 2012 Jul 31.

Increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue and fat free mass in women with polycystic ovary syndrome is related to impaired insulin sensitivity.

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1
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Gulhane School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. draydoganaydogdu@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The present study was performed to search whether subcutaneous and whole body adipose tissue increase and they relate to measures of insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

52 women with PCOS and 53 healthy controls, all with similar age and body mass index participated in the study. A skinfold caliper device was used to measure biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thickness (SFT). Mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) was measured using a tape measure. Body fat distributions were determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Insulin resistance score was computed with the HOMA formula. Plasma adiponectin was measured by EIA.

RESULTS:

SFT in all defined areas, MUAC, total body and trunk fat free mass, and HOMA score were higher in women with PCOS compared with healthy women, while adiponectin level was significantly lower. SFT values correlated positively with HOMA score, and negatively with blood adiponectin level. Regression analysis indicated, SFT in triceps and supscapular areas, trunk fat mass, trunk fat ratio, fat free mass and trunk fat free mass values as the most powerful predictors of HOMA score.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study showed that SFT in different body regions and fat-free tissue mass are increased in women with PCOS, with a significant relation to impaired insulin sensitivity.

PMID:
22849614
DOI:
10.3109/09513590.2012.708802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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