Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Affect Disord. 2012 Dec 20;143(1-3):203-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2012.06.002. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

Hypomanic symptoms assessed by the HCL-32 in patients with major depressive disorder: a multicenter trial across China.

Author information

1
Division of Mood Disorders, Shenzhen Mental Health Centre, Guangdong province, China.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the results of the Hypomania Checklist-32 (HCL-32) administered as a screening instrument in clinical settings to mood disorders patients in the depressive phase.

METHODS:

A total of 1487 patients diagnosed and being treated for major depressive disorder (MDD) in 13 mental health centers across China were self-rated by the HCL-32 and independently examined by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).

RESULTS:

After examination by the MINI, 309 (20.8%) of the 1487 patients clinically diagnosed as having MDD satisfied DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder (BD): 118 (7.9%) for bipolar I disorder (BD-I) and 191 (12.8%) for bipolar II disorder (BD-II). The mean HCL-32 score of the BD patients was statistically higher than that of patients with unipolar depression (UD, major depressive disorder), BD-II higher than UD, while no significant difference between BD-I and BD-II. The HCL-32 distinguished between BD and UD (best cutoff score 14), between BD-II and UD (best cutoff 12). At the optimum cutoff of 12 between BD and UD, the sensitivity was 0.86, specificity 0.69.

LIMITATIONS:

No standardized instruments were used to measure the severity of depressive symptoms. Depressed patients with a previous history of BD were excluded from this study.

CONCLUSIONS:

The HCL-32 results in this multicenter study of patients in the depressive phase were similar to those of earlier, generally smaller-scale studies which subjects could be in any mood phases. A score of 12 could be used as the optimum cutoff between BD and UD to improve screening for BD-II if the HCL-32 was applied in clinical settings in China.

PMID:
22840613
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2012.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center