Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012 Jul 29;12:58.

Common ALDH2 genetic variants predict development of hypertension in the SAPPHIRe prospective cohort: gene-environmental interaction with alcohol consumption.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genetic variants near/within the ALDH2 gene encoding the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 have been associated with blood pressure and hypertension in several case-control association studies in East Asian populations.

METHODS:

Three common tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNP) in the ALDH2 gene were genotyped in 1,134 subjects of Chinese origin from the Stanford Asia-Pacific Program for Hypertension and Insulin Resistance (SAPPHIRe) family cohort. We examined whether the ALDH2 SNP genotypes predicted the development of hypertension in the prospective SAPPHIRe cohort.

RESULTS:

Over an average follow-up period of 5.7  years, carriers homozygous for the rs2238152 T allele in the ALDH2 gene were more likely to progress to hypertension than were non-carriers (hazard ratio [HR], 2.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-7.84, P = 0.03), corresponding to a population attributable risk of ~7.1%. The risk associated with the rs2238152 T allele were strongest in heavy/moderate alcohol drinkers and was reduced in non-drinkers, indicating an interaction between ALDH2 genetic variants and alcohol intake on the risk of hypertension (P for interaction = 0.04). The risk allele was associated with significantly lower ALDH2 gene expression levels in human adipose tissue.

CONCLUSION:

ALDH2 genetic variants were associated with progression to hypertension in a prospective Chinese cohort. The association was modified by alcohol consumption.

PMID:
22839215
PMCID:
PMC3476438
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2261-12-58
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center