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Diabetes. 2012 Nov;61(11):2932-6. doi: 10.2337/db12-0217. Epub 2012 Jul 26.

C1q/TNF-related protein-3 (CTRP-3) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

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Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea.


Recent studies have suggested that a novel adipokine, C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein-3 (CTRP-3), a paralog of adiponectin, may play an important role in the regulation of glucose metabolism and innate immunity. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a multifunctional protein with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. We examined circulating CTRP-3 and PEDF concentrations in 345 subjects with diverse glucose tolerance statuses. Furthermore, we evaluated the involvement of CTRP-3 and PEDF with cardiometabolic risk factors including insulin resistance, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). CTRP-3 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes than the normal glucose tolerance group, whereas PEDF levels were not different. Subjects with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher levels of both CTRP-3 and PEDF compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. Both CTRP-3 and PEDF were significantly associated with cardiometabolic parameters, including waist-to-hip ratio, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, eGFR, hsCRP, and baPWV. In conclusion, circulating CTRP-3 concentrations were elevated in patients with glucose metabolism dysregulation. Both CTRP-3 and PEDF concentrations were increased in subjects with metabolic syndrome and associated with various cardiometabolic risk factors.


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