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Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Aug;27(4):369-74. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

The impact of stress on paramedic performance during simulated critical events.

Author information

1
Wilson Centre and Faculty of Dentistry, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. vicki.leblanc@utoronto.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Substantial research demonstrates that the stressors accompanying the profession of paramedicine can lead to mental health concerns. In contrast, little is known about the effects of stress on paramedics' ability to care for patients during stressful events. In this study, we examined paramedics' acute stress responses and performance during simulated high-stress scenarios.

METHODS:

Twenty-two advanced care paramedics participated in simulated low-stress and high-stress clinical scenarios. The paramedics provided salivary cortisol samples and completed an anxiety questionnaire at baseline and following each scenario. Clinical performance was videotaped and scored on a checklist of specific actions and a global rating of performance. The paramedics also completed patient care documentation following each scenario.

RESULTS:

The paramedics demonstrated greater increases in anxiety (P < .05) and salivary cortisol levels (P < .05) in response to the high-stress scenario compared to the low-stress scenario. Global rating scores were significantly lower in the high-stress scenario than in the low-stress scenario (P < .05). Checklist scores were not significantly different between the two scenarios (P = .12). There were more errors of commission (reporting information not present in the scenario) in the patient care documentation following the high-stress scenario than following the low-stress scenario (P < .05). In contrast, there were no differences in omission errors (failing to recall information present in the scenario) between the two scenarios (P = .34).

CONCLUSION:

Clinical performance and documentation appear vulnerable to the impact of acute stress. This highlights the importance of developing systems and training interventions aimed at supporting and preparing emergency workers who face acute stressors as part of their every day work responsibilities.

PMID:
22831965
DOI:
10.1017/S1049023X12001021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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