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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Nov;207(5):425.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.06.055. Epub 2012 Jun 29.

Obstetrical anal sphincter laceration and anal incontinence 5-10 years after childbirth.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term impact of anal sphincter laceration on anal incontinence.

STUDY DESIGN:

Five to 10 years after first delivery, anal incontinence and other bowel symptoms were measured with the Epidemiology of Prolapse and Incontinence Questionnaire and the short form of the Colorectal-Anal Impact Questionnaire. Obstetric exposures were assessed with review of hospital records. Symptoms and quality-of-life impact were compared among 90 women with at least 1 anal sphincter laceration, 320 women who delivered vaginally without sphincter laceration, and 527 women who delivered by cesarean delivery.

RESULTS:

Women who sustained an anal sphincter laceration were most likely to report anal incontinence (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.26) and reported the greatest negative impact on quality of life. Anal incontinence and quality-of-life scores were similar between women who delivered by cesarean section and those who delivered vaginally without sphincter laceration.

CONCLUSION:

Anal sphincter laceration is associated with anal incontinence 5-10 years after delivery.

PMID:
22831810
PMCID:
PMC3484184
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2012.06.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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