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Nat Rev Immunol. 2012 Jul 25;12(8):570-80. doi: 10.1038/nri3261.

Lighting the fires within: the cell biology of autoinflammatory diseases.

Author information

1
Immunoregulation Section, Autoimmunity Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

Autoinflammatory diseases are characterized by seemingly unprovoked pathological activation of the innate immune system in the absence of autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells. Discovery of the causative mutations underlying several monogenic autoinflammatory diseases has identified key regulators of innate immune responses. Recent studies have highlighted the role of misfolding, oligomerization and abnormal trafficking of pathogenic mutant proteins in triggering autoinflammation, and suggest that more common rheumatic diseases may have an autoinflammatory component. This coincides with recent discoveries of new links between endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory signalling pathways, which support the emerging view that autoinflammatory diseases may be due to pathological dysregulation of stress-sensing pathways that normally function in host defence.

PMID:
22828911
PMCID:
PMC4165575
DOI:
10.1038/nri3261
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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