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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Dec;93(12):2229-36. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.07.004. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

Role of social support in predicting caregiver burden.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Jur17@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the unique contribution of social support to burden in caregivers of adults aging with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN:

Secondary analyses of cross-sectional data from a large cohort of adults aging with SCI and their primary caregivers.

SETTING:

Multiple community locations.

PARTICIPANTS:

Caregivers of community-dwelling adults aging with SCI (n=173) were interviewed as part of a multisite randomized controlled trial. The mean age ± SD of caregivers was 53±15 years and of care-recipients, 55±13 years.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The primary outcome was caregiver burden measured with the Abridged Version of the Zarit Burden Interview. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis examined the effects of social supports (social integration, received social support, and negative social interactions) on burden in caregivers of adults aging with SCI while controlling for demographic characteristics and caregiving characteristics.

RESULTS:

After controlling for demographic characteristics and caregiving characteristics, social integration (β=-.16, P<.05), received social support (β=-.15, P<.05), and negative social interactions (β=.21, P<.01) were significant independent predictors of caregiver burden.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings demonstrate that social support is an important factor associated with burden in caregivers of adults aging with SCI. Social support should be considered for assessments and interventions designed to identify and reduce caregiver burden.

PMID:
22824248
PMCID:
PMC3508254
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2012.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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