Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Lett. 2013 Jun 28;334(1):34-8. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2012.07.016. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

Tobacco smoke biomarkers and cancer risk among male smokers in the Shanghai cohort study.

Author information

1
Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, United States. Electronic address: hecht002@umn.edu.
2
Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, United States.
3
University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, United States.

Abstract

Metabolites of tobacco smoke constituents can be quantified in urine and other body fluids providing a realistic measure of carcinogen and toxicant dose in a smoker. Many previous studies have demonstrated that these metabolites - referred to as biomarkers in this paper - are related to tobacco smoke exposure. The studies reviewed here were designed to answer another question: are these substances also biomarkers of cancer risk? Using a prospective study design comparing biomarker levels in cancer cases and controls, all of whom were smokers, the results demonstrate that several of these biomarkers - total cotinine, total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), r-1-,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene (PheT), and total N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) - are biomarkers of cancer risk. Therefore, these biomarkers have the potential to become part of a cancer risk prediction algorithm for smokers.

PMID:
22824243
PMCID:
PMC3648613
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2012.07.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center