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Ann Clin Biochem. 1990 Sep;27 ( Pt 5):489-93.

Postprandial effect of a high fat meal on plasma lipid, lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein measurements.

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1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Abstract

We investigated the effect of a fatty meal on plasma concentrations of lipids, apolipoproteins, and the cholesterol component of lipoproteins. Sixteen nonobese, healthy, asymptomatic males, 22-34 years of age, served as subjects for this study. None smoked, consumed more than two alcoholic drinks per day, or took any medication known to alter plasma lipids. After a 12 h fast, baseline plasma samples were obtained just before subjects consumed a high fat meal. The meal, standardized to a 70 kg individual, contained approximately 70 g fat, 580 mg cholesterol, and 1,100 cal, with 56% of the calories coming from fat. During the 8 h following consumption of the meal, subjects rested quietly and consumed no food or beverages except water. Blood specimens were obtained hourly. There was a significant increase in plasma triglyceride (150% from baseline at 3 h, P less than 0.0005). Very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) concentrations increased 150% at 3 h (P less than 0.0005) while low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration decreased 37% at 3 h (P less than 0.005) when estimated by Friedewald's formula. No statistically significant differences were observed between fasting total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). HDL2-C, and HDL3-C, apolipoprotein AI (apo AI, AII), and B-100 concentrations and non-fasting samples. We conclude that plasma triglyceride concentration is significantly affected in the post-prandial state. As a result, VLDL-C and LDL-C when assessed by the Friedewald formula are also altered. A minimum of 8 h fasting is required to assess these concentrations accurately in this population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
2281930
DOI:
10.1177/000456329002700512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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