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Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2012 Sep;15(5):430-5. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0b013e328356e068.

The anaerobic threshold: over-valued or under-utilized? A novel concept to enhance lipid optimization!

Author information

1
University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405, USA. Declan.connolly@uvm.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The purpose of this article is to assess the value of the anaerobic threshold for use in clinical populations with the intent to improve exercise adaptations and outcomes. The anaerobic threshold is generally poorly understood, improperly used, and poorly measured. It is rarely used in clinical settings and often reserved for athletic performance testing.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Increased exercise participation within both clinical and other less healthy populations has increased our attention to optimizing exercise outcomes. Of particular interest is the optimization of lipid metabolism during exercise in order to improve numerous conditions such as blood lipid profile, insulin sensitivity and secretion, and weight loss. Numerous authors report on the benefits of appropriate exercise intensity in optimizing outcomes even though regulation of intensity has proved difficult for many. Despite limited use, selected exercise physiology markers have considerable merit in exercise-intensity regulation. The anaerobic threshold, and other markers such as heart rate, may well provide a simple and valuable mechanism for regulating exercising intensity.

SUMMARY:

The use of the anaerobic threshold and accurate target heart rate to regulate exercise intensity is a valuable approach that is under-utilized across populations. The measurement of the anaerobic threshold can be simplified to allow clients to use nonlaboratory measures, for example heart rate, in order to self-regulate exercise intensity and improve outcomes.

PMID:
22814627
DOI:
10.1097/MCO.0b013e328356e068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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