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Phys Ther Sport. 2012 Aug;13(3):134-40. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2011.08.004. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

EMG of the hip adductor muscles in six clinical examination tests.

Author information

1
Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), Dept. of Sports Medicine, Leverrier St., Bruce, ACT 2617, Australia. greg.lovell@ausport.gov.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess activation of muscles of hip adduction using EMG and force analysis during standard clinical tests, and compare athletes with and without a prior history of groin pain.

STUDY DESIGN:

Controlled laboratory study.

PARTICIPANTS:

21 male athletes from an elite junior soccer program.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Bilateral surface EMG recordings of the adductor magnus, adductor longus, gracilis and pectineus as well as a unilateral fine-wire EMG of the pectineus were made during isometric holds in six clinical examination tests. A load cell was used to measure force data.

RESULTS:

Test type was a significant factor in the EMG output for all four muscles (all muscles p < 0.01). EMG activation was highest in Hips 0 or Hips 45 for adductor magnus, adductor longus and gracilis. EMG activation for pectineus was highest in Hips 90. Injury history was a significant factor in the EMG output for the adductor longus (p < 0.05), pectineus (p < 0.01) and gracilis (p < 0.01) but not adductor magnus. For force data, clinical test type was a significant factor (p < 0.01) with Hips 0 being significantly stronger than Hips 45, Hips 90 and Side lay. BMI (body mass index) was a significant factor (p < 0.01) for producing a higher force. All other factors had no significant effect on the force outputs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hip adduction strength assessment is best measured at hips 0 (which produced most force) or 45° flexion (which generally gave the highest EMG output). Muscle EMG varied significantly with clinical test position. Athletes with previous groin injury had a significant fall in some EMG outputs.

PMID:
22814446
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2011.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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