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Drugs Aging. 2012 Aug 1;29(8):691-9. doi: 10.2165/11632510-000000000-00000.

Association between acute geriatric syndromes and medication-related hospital admissions.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elderly patients are at a 4-fold higher risk of adverse drug events (ADEs) and drug-related hospitalization. Hospitalization of an elderly patient is often preceded by geriatric syndromes, like falls or delirium.

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether geriatric syndromes were associated with ADEs in acutely admitted elderly patients.

METHODS:

Consecutive medical patients, aged 65 years or more, who were acutely admitted, were enrolled. An initial multidisciplinary evaluation was completed and baseline characteristics were collected. A fall before admission was retrieved from medical charts. Delirium was determined by the Confusion Assessment Method.

RESULTS:

A total of 641 patients were included. Over 25% had an ADE present at admission, 26% presented with delirium and 12% with a fall. Delirium was associated with the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics and antiepileptics. In all ADEs (nā€‰=ā€‰167), ADEs were associated with a fall, with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or diuretics, but not with pre-existing functioning, delirium or older age. For ADEs involving psychoactive medication (nā€‰=ā€‰35), an association was found between delirium, falls, opioids and antipsychotics in bivariate analyses. A fall just before hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] 3.69 [95% CI 1.41, 9.67]), antipsychotics (OR 3.70 [95% CI 1.19, 11.60]) and opioids (OR 14.57 [95% CI 2.02, 105.30]) remained independently associated with an ADE involving psychoactive medication.

CONCLUSION:

This prospective study demonstrated that, in a cohort of elderly hospital patients, a fall before admission and prevalent delirium are associated with several pharmacological groups and/or with ADE-related hospital admission.

PMID:
22812539
PMCID:
PMC3622589
DOI:
10.2165/11632510-000000000-00000
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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