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Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2012 Sep;16(3):233-7. doi: 10.3109/13651501.2011.625123. Epub 2012 Jul 19.

Bright light treatment as mono-therapy of non-seasonal depression for 28 adolescents.

Author information

1
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saechsisches Krankenhaus Rodewisch, Rodewisch, Germany. helmutniederhofer@yahoo.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bright light therapy, an effective therapeutic option for depressive adults, could provide safe, economic, and effective rapid recovery also in adolescents.

METHODS:

Twenty-eight volunteers, between 14 and 17 years old and suffering from mild depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria, completed the study. This was a randomized cross-over trial, i.e. that 14 patients received first placebo (50 lux) for 1 h a day for 1 week and then bright light therapy (2,500 Lux) for 1 week. Fourteen patients received first bright light therapy and then placebo. For assessment of depressive symptoms, Beck's depression inventory scales were administered 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and verum treatment, on the day after verum treatment and 1 week after verum treatment. Saliva melatonin and cortisol samples were collected at 08:00 and 20:00 h, 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and verum treatment, on the day after verum treatment and 1 week after verum treatment and assayed for melatonin and cortisol to observe any change in circadian timing.

RESULTS:

BDI scores improved significantly. The assays of saliva showed significant differences between treatment and placebo. No significant adverse reactions were observed.

CONCLUSION:

Antidepressant response to bright light treatment in this age group was statistically superior to placebo.

PMID:
22809107
DOI:
10.3109/13651501.2011.625123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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