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Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46(2):246-56. doi: 10.1002/mus.23306.

Proteomic analysis in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology and Metabolism, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a progressive hereditary disease that affects the peripheral and central nervous systems. It is characterized morphologically by aggregates of intermediate filaments in different tissues. Mutations have been reported in the gene that codes for gigaxonin. Nevertheless, the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure.

METHODS:

Cell lines from 4 GAN patients and 4 controls were analyzed by iTRAQ.

RESULTS:

Among the dysregulated proteins were ribosomal protein L29, ribosomal protein L37, galectin-1, glia-derived nexin, and aminopeptidase N. Also, nuclear proteins linked to formin-binding proteins were found to be dysregulated. Although the major role of gigaxonin is reported to be degradation of cytoskeleton-associated proteins, the amount of 76 structural cytoskeletal proteins was unaltered.

CONCLUSIONS:

Several of the dysregulated proteins play a role in cytoskeletal reorganization. Based on these findings, we speculate that disturbed cytoskeletal regulation is responsible for formation of aggregates of intermediate filaments.

PMID:
22806374
DOI:
10.1002/mus.23306
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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