Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Child Obes. 2012 Jun;8(3):224-9. doi: 10.1089/chi.2011.0061.

Participation in the child and adult care food program is associated with more nutritious foods and beverages in child care.

Author information

1
Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Center for Weight and Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. LRitchie@berkeley.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nearly two million California children regularly spend time in child care. Surprisingly little is known about the nutrition environments of these settings. The aim of this study was to compare foods and beverages served to 2- to 5-year-olds by type of child care and participation in the federally funded Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

METHODS:

A statewide survey of child care providers (n = 429) was administered. Licensed child care was divided into six categories: Head Start centers, state preschools, centers that participate in CACFP, non-CACFP centers, homes that participate in CACFP, and non-CACFP homes.

RESULTS:

CACFP sites in general, and Head Start centers in particular, served more fruits, vegetables, milk, and meat/meat alternatives, and fewer sweetened beverages and other sweets and snack-type items than non-CACFP sites. Reported barriers to providing nutritious foods included high food costs and lack of training.

CONCLUSIONS:

CACFP participation may be one means by which reimbursement for food can be increased and food offerings improved. Further research should investigate whether promoting CACFP participation can be used to provide healthier nutrition environments in child care and prevent obesity in young children.

PMID:
22799548
DOI:
10.1089/chi.2011.0061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center