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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2012 Jul 16;10(8):525-37. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro2836.

Nutritional immunity: transition metals at the pathogen-host interface.

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1
Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, A5102 MCN, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA.

Abstract

Transition metals occupy an essential niche in biological systems. Their electrostatic properties stabilize substrates or reaction intermediates in the active sites of enzymes, and their heightened reactivity is harnessed for catalysis. However, this heightened activity also renders transition metals toxic at high concentrations. Bacteria, like all living organisms, must regulate their intracellular levels of these elements to satisfy their physiological needs while avoiding harm. It is therefore not surprising that the host capitalizes on both the essentiality and toxicity of transition metals to defend against bacterial invaders. This Review discusses established and emerging paradigms in nutrient metal homeostasis at the pathogen-host interface.

PMID:
22796883
PMCID:
PMC3875331
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro2836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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