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Front Neuroendocrinol. 2013 Jan;34(1):47-64. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2012.07.001. Epub 2012 Jul 11.

Vitamin D, effects on brain development, adult brain function and the links between low levels of vitamin D and neuropsychiatric disease.

Author information

1
Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The Park Centre for Mental Health, Wacol, QLD 4076, Australia. eyles@uq.edu.au

Abstract

Increasingly vitamin D deficiency is being associated with a number of psychiatric conditions. In particular for disorders with a developmental basis, such as autistic spectrum disorder and schizophrenia the neurobiological plausibility of this association is strengthened by the preclinical data indicating vitamin D deficiency in early life affects neuronal differentiation, axonal connectivity, dopamine ontogeny and brain structure and function. More recently epidemiological associations have been made between low vitamin D and psychiatric disorders not typically associated with abnormalities in brain development such as depression and Alzheimer's disease. Once again the preclinical findings revealing that vitamin D can regulate catecholamine levels and protect against specific Alzheimer-like pathology increase the plausibility of this link. In this review we have attempted to integrate this clinical epidemiology with potential vitamin D-mediated basic mechanisms. Throughout the review we have highlighted areas where we think future research should focus.

PMID:
22796576
DOI:
10.1016/j.yfrne.2012.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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