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Phytochemistry. 2012 Sep;81:80-9. doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2012.06.010. Epub 2012 Jul 12.

Elemental and metabolite profiling of nickel hyperaccumulators from New Caledonia.

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1
Metabolomics Australia, School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. damienlc@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Leaf material from nine Ni hyperaccumulating species was collected in New Caledonia: Homalium kanaliense (Vieill.) Briq., Casearia silvana Schltr, Geissois hirsuta Brongn. & Gris, Hybanthus austrocaledonicus Seem, Psychotria douarrei (G. Beauvis.) Däniker, Pycnandra acuminata (Pierre ex Baill.) Swenson & Munzinger (syn Sebertia acuminata Pierre ex Baill.), Geissois pruinosa Brongn. & Gris, Homalium deplanchei (Viell) Warb. and Geissois bradfordii (H.C. Hopkins). The elemental concentration was determined by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and from these results it was found that the species contained Ni concentrations from to 250-28,000 mg/kg dry mass. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolite profiling was then used to analyse leaves of each species. The aim of this study was to target Ni-binding ligands through correlation analysis of the metabolite levels and leaf Ni concentration. Approximately 258 compounds were detected in each sample. As has been observed before, a correlation was found between the citric acid and Ni concentrations in the leaves for all species collected. However, the strongest Ni accumulator, P. douarrei, has been found to contain particularly high concentrations of malonic acid, suggesting an additional storage mechanism for Ni. A size exclusion chromatography separation protocol for the separation of Ni-complexes in P. acuminata sap was also applied to aqueous leaf extracts of each species. A number of metabolites were identified in complexes with Ni including Ni-malonate from P. douarrei. Furthermore, the levels for some metabolites were found to correlate with the leaf Ni concentration. These data show that Ni ions can be bound by a range of small molecules in Ni hyperaccumulation in plants.

PMID:
22795763
DOI:
10.1016/j.phytochem.2012.06.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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