Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Nov;38(6):539-43. doi: 10.3109/00952990.2012.701359. Epub 2012 Jul 16.

Combining rapid HIV testing and a brief alcohol intervention in young unhealthy drinkers in the emergency department: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. ejennifer.edelman@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to determine the feasibility and impact of brief alcohol/ sexual risk reduction counseling with rapid HIV testing in the emergency department (ED).

METHODS:

We recruited 18-40 year olds with unhealthy alcohol use, sexual risk behaviors, and negative/unknown HIV status and assessed for differences in their alcohol consumption and sexual risk behaviors at baseline versus 2 months.

RESULTS:

Participants (n = 85) were 61% male, mean age 26 years old, 59% white, 92% unmarried, 57% college educated, 45% without a regular doctor, and 80% with an Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) score ≥8. All rapid HIV tests were negative. Among the 70 (82%) with follow-up, alcohol consumption decreased with fewer average weekly drinks (23.6 vs. 9.8, p = .003) and binge drinking episodes (2.0 vs. .9, p = .012). Post-intervention, sexual risk decreased, including increased condom use (23% vs. 46%, p = .007). Women had a greater decrease in alcohol use prior to sex compared with men (p = .021 for interaction).

CONCLUSIONS:

Alcohol/sexual risk reduction counseling with HIV testing in the ED is feasible and potentially effective for reducing alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors among young unhealthy drinkers.

SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

Future randomized controlled trials are warranted to assess efficacy of this intervention, which would provide young at-risk populations with important preventive services, which they may not have access to otherwise.

PMID:
22794939
PMCID:
PMC3522092
DOI:
10.3109/00952990.2012.701359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center