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Brain Inj. 2012;26(13-14):1629-35. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2012.700083. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

Increased levels of serum MAP-2 at 6-months correlate with improved outcome in survivors of severe traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
University of Florida, Department of Anesthesiology, Gainesville, FL, USA. stm_mondello@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate microtubule-associated proteins (MAP-2), a dendritic marker of both acute damage and chronic neuronal regeneration after injury, in serum of survivors after severe TBI and examine the association with long-term outcome.

METHODS:

Serum concentrations of MAP-2 were evaluated in 16 patients with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score [GCS] ≤ 8) 6 months post-injury and in 16 controls. Physical and cognitive outcomes were assessed, using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) and Levels of Cognitive Functioning Scale (LCFS), respectively.

RESULTS:

Severe TBI patients had significantly higher serum MAP-2 concentrations than normal controls with no history of TBI (p = 0.008) at 6 months post-injury. MAP-2 levels correlated with the GOSE (r = 0.58, p = 0.02) and LCFS (r = 0.65, p = 0.007) at month 6. Significantly lower serum levels of MAP-2 were observed in patients in a vegetative state (VS) compared to non-VS patients (p < 0.05). A trend tracking the level of consciousness was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Severe TBI results in a chronic release of MAP-2 into the peripheral circulation in patients with higher levels of consciousness, suggesting that remodelling of synaptic junctions and neuroplasticity processes occur several months after injury. The data indicate MAP-2 as a potential marker for emergence to higher levels of cognitive function.

PMID:
22794497
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2012.700083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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