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PPAR Res. 2012;2012:289867. doi: 10.1155/2012/289867. Epub 2012 Jun 26.

PPARγ Signaling Mediates the Evolution, Development, Homeostasis, and Repair of the Lung.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Torrance, CA 90502, USA.

Abstract

Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediated by soluble growth factors determine the evolution of vertebrate lung physiology, including development, homeostasis, and repair. The final common pathway for all of these positively adaptive properties of the lung is the expression of epithelial parathyroid-hormone-related protein, and its binding to its receptor on the mesenchyme, inducing PPARγ expression by lipofibroblasts. Lipofibroblasts then produce leptin, which binds to alveolar type II cells, stimulating their production of surfactant, which is necessary for both evolutionary and physiologic adaptation to atmospheric oxygen from fish to man. A wide variety of molecular insults disrupt such highly evolved physiologic cell-cell interactions, ranging from overdistention to oxidants, infection, and nicotine, all of which predictably cause loss of mesenchymal peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) expression and the transdifferentiation of lipofibroblasts to myofibroblasts, the signature cell type for lung fibrosis. By exploiting such deep cell-molecular functional homologies as targets for leveraging lung homeostasis, we have discovered that we can effectively prevent and/or reverse the deleterious effects of these pathogenic agents, demonstrating the utility of evolutionary biology for the prevention and treatment of chronic lung disease. By understanding mechanisms of health and disease as an evolutionary continuum rather than as dissociated processes, we can evolve predictive medicine.

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