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Ann Surg. 2012 Aug;256(2):235-44. doi: 10.1097/SLA.0b013e31825b35d5.

Effects of allogeneic red blood cell transfusions on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Disease Centre NIHR, Biomedical Research Unit, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom. austin.acheson@nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effect of allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) on clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer undergoing surgery.

BACKGROUND:

Perioperative ABTs may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes.

METHODS:

Systematic review of the literature with odds ratio (OR) and incidence rate ratio (IRR) meta-analyses of predefined clinical outcomes based on a MEDLINE search.

RESULTS:

In total, 20,795 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients observed for more than 59.2 ± 26.1 months (108,838 patient years) were included, of which 58.8% were transfused. ABT was associated with increased all-cause mortality OR = 1.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.55-1.91, P < 0.001); I(2) = 23.3% (0-51.1) and IRR = 1.31 (1.23-1.39, P < 0.001), I(2) = 0.0% (0-37.0). ABT was also associated with increased ORs (95% CI, P) for cancer-related mortality of 1.71 (1.43-2.05, P <0.001), combined recurrence-metastasis-death 1.66 (1.41-1.97, P < 0.001), postoperative infection 3.27 (2.05-5.20, P < 0.001), and surgical reintervention 4.08 (2.18-7.62, <0.001). IRR (95% CI, P) was 1.45 (1.26-1.66, <0.001) for cancer-related mortality and 1.32 (1.19-1.46, <0.001) for recurrence-metastasis-death. Mean length of hospital stay was significantly longer in transfused compared with nontransfused patients (17.8 ± 4.8 vs 13.9 ± 4.7 days, P = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing surgery, ABTs are associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including increased mortality. Measures aimed at limiting the use of ABTs should be investigated further.

PMID:
22791100
DOI:
10.1097/SLA.0b013e31825b35d5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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