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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Dec;93(12):2206-9. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.06.026. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

Central hypersensitivity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

Author information

1
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the presence of primary and secondary hyperalgesia among subjects with chronic subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) compared with pain-free controls.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional design.

SETTING:

Outpatient rehabilitation clinic, urban, academic medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Volunteer sample (N=62) (31 with SIS, 31 controls).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured at the middle deltoid of the affected/dominant arm (primary or secondary hyperalgesia) and the middle deltoid and tibialis anterior of the unaffected/nondominant side (secondary hyperalgesia) in SIS and healthy controls, respectively. Differences in PPTs were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum test and with linear regression analysis controlling for sex, a known confounder of PPTs.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for sex, subjects with SIS had significantly lower PPTs than did controls at all locations. Controls had a 1.4 kg/cm(2) (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5) higher PPT at their affected shoulder than did those with SIS, a 0.7 kg/cm(2) (95% CI, 0.5-0.9) higher PPT at their nonaffected shoulder, and a 1.1 kg/cm(2) (95% CI, 1.1-1.2) higher PPT at their contralateral tibialis anterior. Observers were not blinded to patient groupings but were blinded to the level of applied pressure.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides further evidence that patients with SIS have significantly lower PPTs than do controls in both local and distal areas from their affected arm consistent with primary and secondary hyperalgesia, respectively. Data suggest the presence of central sensitization among subjects with chronic SIS.

PMID:
22789774
PMCID:
PMC3508388
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2012.06.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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