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Respir Care. 2013 Mar;58(3):465-73.

Comparing the effects of rise time and inspiratory cycling criteria on 6 different mechanical ventilators.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Care, Texas State University-San Marcos, 601 University Drive, San Marcos TX 78666, USA. jg61@txstate.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inspiratory rise time and cycling criteria are important settings in pressure support ventilation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of minimum and maximum rise time and inspiratory cycling criteria settings on 6 new generation ventilators. Our hypothesis was there would be a difference in the exhaled tidal volume, inspiratory time, and peak flow among 6 different ventilators, based, on change in rise time and cycling criteria.

METHODS:

The research utilized a breathing simulator and 4 different ventilator models. All mechanical ventilators were set to a spontaneous mode of ventilation with settings of pressure support 8 cm H2O and PEEP of 5 cm H2O. A minimum and maximum setting for rise time and cycling criteria were examined. Exhaled tidal volume, inspiratory time, and peak flow measurements were recorded for each simulation.

RESULTS:

Significant (P < .001) differences were found when comparing minimum and maximum rise time and minimum and maximum cycling criteria for each ventilator.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant differences in exhaled tidal volume, inspiratory time, and peak flow were observed by adjusting rise time and cycling criteria. This research demonstrates that during pressure support ventilation strategy, adjustments in rise time and/or cycling criteria can produce changes in inspiratory parameters. Obviously, this finding has important implications for practitioners who utilize a similar pressure support strategy when conducting a ventilator wean. Additionally, this study outlines major differences among ventilator manufacturers when considering inspiratory rise time and cycling criteria.

PMID:
22781498
DOI:
10.4187/respcare.01345
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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