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J Invasive Cardiol. 2012 Jul;24(7):309-15.

Very long-term clinical follow-up after fractional flow reserve-guided coronary revascularization.

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1
VA New York Harbor Health Care System New York Campus, New York, NY 10010, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Randomized trials using measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) to guide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have demonstrated both safety and efficacy with regard to cardiac events. Real-world, long-term outcomes using an FFR-based revascularization strategy are unknown.

METHODS:

Prospective clinical data were collected on consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography and found to have lesions of intermediate severity where the operators were unable to make a decision regarding revascularization based on angiographic, clinical, and stress testing parameters. FFR was measured on intermediate lesions, and revascularization was deferred on those lesions with a measurement >0.8. Clinical outcomes of interest included death, myocardial infarction, and late revascularization status.

RESULTS:

A total of 151 patients were included in this study. Fifty-seven patients (37.7%) underwent revascularization based on their FFR measurement. The mean length of follow-up was 6.1 years (range, 5-10 years). Follow-up was completed in 97.0%. At the end of the follow-up period, 107 patients (70.9%) were alive. Late revascularization had been performed in 18 patients (11.9%). Comparing the initial revascularization group with the group in which revascularization was deferred, 64.9% and 74.5% were alive, respectively (P=.29). Of the initial revascularization group, 12.3% had undergone late revascularization of the lesion on which FFR was originally performed, compared with 11.7% in the deferred group (P=.99).

CONCLUSIONS:

FFR is a useful adjunct to coronary angiography in selecting patients with lesions of intermediate angiographic severity in whom coronary revascularization may be safely deferred.

PMID:
22781467
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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