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J Altern Complement Med. 2013 Feb;19(2):170-7. doi: 10.1089/acm.2012.0384. Epub 2012 Jul 9.

Visceral and somatic disorders: tissue softening with frequency-specific microcurrent.

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1
Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Clinic of Portland, Portland, OR 97214, USA. cmcmakin@msn.com

Abstract

Frequency-specific microcurrent (FSM) is an emerging technique for treating many health conditions. Pairs of frequencies of microampere-level electrical stimulation are applied to particular places on the skin of a patient via combinations of conductive graphite gloves, moistened towels, or gel electrode patches. A consistent finding is a profound and palpable tissue softening and warming within seconds of applying frequencies appropriate for treating particular conditions. Similar phenomena are often observed with successful acupuncture, cranial-sacral, and other energy-based techniques. This article explores possible mechanisms involved in tissue softening. In the 1970s, neuroscientist and osteopathic researcher Irvin Korr developed a "γ-loop hypothesis" to explain the persistence of increased systemic muscle tone associated with various somatic dysfunctions. This article summarizes how physiologists, neuroscientists, osteopaths, chiropractors, and fascial researchers have expanded on Korr's ideas by exploring various mechanisms by which injury or disease increase local muscle tension or systemic muscle tone. Following on Korr's hypothesis, it is suggested that most patients actually present with elevated muscle tone or tense areas due to prior traumas or other disorders, and that tissue softening indicates that FSM or other methods are affecting the cause of their pathophysiology. The authors believe this concept and the research it has led to will be of interest to a wide range of energetic, bodywork, and movement therapists.

PMID:
22775307
PMCID:
PMC3576917
DOI:
10.1089/acm.2012.0384
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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