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Ethn Dis. 2012 Winter;22(1):90-5.

Racial and ethnic disparities in lifetime risk of corpus uterine cancer: a comparative study of Puerto Rico and the United States SEER population.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan. ana.ortiz7@upr.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Corpus uterine cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in Puerto Rico and the United States.

METHODS:

We assessed the lifetime risk of developing and dying of corpus uterine cancer in women living in Puerto Rico (PR) and among Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites (NHW), and non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) in the United States. Data from the PR Central Cancer Registry and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program were analyzed from 1993-2004.

RESULTS:

In PR, the probability of developing corpus uterine cancer increased from 1.21% in 1993-1995 to 1.69% in 2002-2004. The probability of developing this malignancy from 2002-2004 was 1.59% for NHB, 1.80% for Hispanics and 2.54% for NHW. The ratio of estimated probabilities only showed significant lower risk in PR as compared to NHW (.67, 95% CI = .59-.74). The probability of dying from corpus uterine cancer during 2002-2004 was .47% for Hispanics, .49% for NHW, .53% for PR and .76% for NHB. The ratio of estimated probabilities only showed significant lower risk of death in PR as compared to NHB (.70, 95% CI = .54-.85).

CONCLUSIONS:

The lifetime risk of developing corpus uterine cancer has increased in PR, suggesting higher exposure to risk factors in this population. Despite the lower lifetime risk of this malignancy in PR as compared to NHW, the similar lifetime risk of death in these groups suggests a disparity that may be influenced by differences in disease etiology and/or access or response to treatment. Assessment of risk factors, in addition to access to health services, is required to further understand these patterns.

PMID:
22774315
PMCID:
PMC4170919
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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