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BMC Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 6;12:76. doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-12-76.

A debate on current eating disorder diagnoses in light of neurobiological findings: is it time for a spectrum model?

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, University of Uppsala, Box 593, Uppsala, Sweden. samantha.brooks@neuro.uu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sixty percent of eating disorders do not meet criteria for anorexia- or bulimia nervosa, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version 4 (DSM-IV). Instead they are diagnosed as 'eating disorders not otherwise specified' (EDNOS). Discrepancies between criteria and clinical reality currently hampering eating disorder diagnoses in the DSM-IV will be addressed by the forthcoming DSM-V. However, future diagnoses for eating disorders will rely on current advances in the fields of neuroimaging and genetics for classification of symptoms that will ultimately improve treatment.

DISCUSSION:

Here we debate the classification issues, and discuss how brain imaging and genetic discoveries might be interwoven into a model of eating disorders to provide better classification and treatment. The debate concerns: a) current issues in the classification of eating disorders in the DSM-IV, b) changes proposed for DSM-V, c) neuroimaging eating disorder research and d) genetic eating disorder research.

SUMMARY:

We outline a novel evidence-based 'impulse control' spectrum model of eating disorders. A model of eating disorders is proposed that will aid future diagnosis of symptoms, coinciding with contemporary suggestions by clinicians and the proposed changes due to be published in the DSM-V.

PMID:
22770364
PMCID:
PMC3475111
DOI:
10.1186/1471-244X-12-76
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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