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Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2012;8:307-12. doi: 10.2147/TCRM.S31482. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Sitapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Poor reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by doctors is a major hindrance to successful pharmacovigilance. The present study was designed to assess first-year residents' knowledge of ADR reporting.

METHODS:

First-year postgraduate doctors at a private medical college completed a structured questionnaire. The responses were analyzed by nonparametric methods.

RESULTS:

All doctors were aware of the term "adverse drug reactions." Fifty percent of the doctors reported being taught about ADR reporting during their undergraduate teaching, and 50% had witnessed ADRs in their internship training. Ten percent of patients suffering an ADR observed and reported by doctors required prolonged hospitalization for treatment as a result. Only 40% of interns reported the ADRs that they observed, while 60% did not report them. Twenty-eight percent reported ADRs to the head of the department, 8% to an ADR monitoring committee, and 4% to the pharmacovigilance center. Eighty-six percent of the doctors surveyed felt that a good knowledge of undergraduate clinical pharmacology therapeutics would have improved the level of ADR reporting.

CONCLUSION:

The knowledge of first-year doctors regarding ADR reporting is quite poor. There is a dire need to incorporate ADR reporting into undergraduate teaching, and to reinforce this during internships and periodically thereafter.

KEYWORDS:

ADR reporting; first-year postgraduate doctors; pharmacovigilance

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