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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Oct;97(10):3717-23. doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-1584. Epub 2012 Jul 5.

Arterial stiffness and vitamin D levels: the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging.

Author information

1
Longitudinal Studies Section, Clinical Research Branch, National Institute on Aging, 3001 South Hanover Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21225, USA. giallauriaf@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The importance of vitamin D for bone health has long been acknowledged. Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D can also play a role in reducing the risk of several other diseases, including cardiovascular disease.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) is an independent cross-sectional correlate of central arterial stiffness in a normative aging study population.

DESIGN AND SETTINGS:

We conducted a cross-sectional analysis.

SUBJECTS:

We studied 1228 healthy volunteers (50% males; age, 70±12 yr) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and 25-OH D levels.

RESULTS:

We found a significant inverse association between PWV and 25-OH D levels (adjusted r2=0.27; β=-0.43; P=0.001). After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, season of blood draw, estimated glomerular filtration rate, physical activity level, cardiovascular risk factors score (smoking, visceral obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes), calcium/vitamin D supplementation, serum calcium, and PTH levels, the association between PWV and 25-OH D levels was only slightly reduced and remained statistically significant (adjusted r2=0.34; β=-0.34; P=0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D levels are inversely associated with increased arterial stiffness in a normative aging population, irrespective of traditional risk factor burden. Further research is needed to understand the mechanism of this association and to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation can reduce arterial stiffness.

PMID:
22767638
PMCID:
PMC3674293
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2012-1584
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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