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Ann Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;22(9):617-22. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.05.005. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on aging: glucose trajectory in a cohort of healthy men.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. msui@mailbox.sc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We modeled the age-related trajectory of glucose and determined whether cardiorespiratory fitness altered the trajectory in a cohort of men from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study.

METHODS:

A total of 10,092 men free of diagnosed diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, ages 20 to 90 years, completed from 2 to 21 health examinations between 1977 and 2005. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a maximal treadmill exercise test and normalized for age. The covariates included waist circumference, hypertension, elevated cholesterol, smoking behavior, and physical activity.

RESULTS:

Linear mixed models regression analysis showed that fasting glucose increased at a linear rate with aging. Glucose increased at a yearly rate of 0.17 mg/dL (95% confidence interval: 0.16-0.19). Fitness had little influence on the aging glucose trajectory below age 35, but significantly influenced the trend after age 35 (P for interaction < .001). The aging-related glucose increases in low-fitness men (0.25 mg/dL per year) was greater than average-fitness (0.15 mg/dL per year) and high-fitness (0.13 mg/dL per year) men.

CONCLUSIONS:

The aging-related fasting glucose increases in low-fitness men was nearly double that of high-fitness men. Our results may suggest that it is possible to delay the age-related glucose impairment through increasing one's fitness level.

PMID:
22763087
PMCID:
PMC3723333
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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